Periphery Ring Shock

Re: Periphery Ring Shock

Postby Vear » Fri Aug 16, 2019 1:24 pm

Mr_Putty wrote:Can the ring belts be easily removed? Yollowish color seems like they are old. Remove and test again. Also, is there any polish on the ring? Try a good cleaning with 91% iso alcohol. Just trying to cover all bases.


Good suggestion. I had already tried removing the bands and there was no change. I went ahead and gave the ring a good wipe down with 91% Alcohol and again there was no change.

Is it possible that it has to do with the interaction with an acrylic platter?
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Re: Periphery Ring Shock

Postby Mr_Putty » Fri Aug 16, 2019 3:53 pm

I’m wondering about the possible acrylic platter interaction as well. If you have a Zerostat and used it before touching the ring I wonder what would happen? (Don’t zap your cart) After you play a record and remove it does it seem to have static charge? Another rabbit hole: You might need to clean your a/c cord contacts (including ground pin) or have a loose ground connection at your outlet. Don’t try to check the outlet unless you know what you are doing! You would need to turn the breaker off that supplies the outlet. It’s pretty common for wire holding screws to get loose over time, if you have those type of connections.
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Re: Periphery Ring Shock

Postby edw » Fri Aug 16, 2019 4:35 pm

Acrylic is a big generator of static charge when rubbed. You need to find a way to discharge that static (hence looking at grounding).
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Re: Periphery Ring Shock

Postby Vear » Fri Aug 16, 2019 6:03 pm

Mr_Putty wrote:I’m wondering about the possible acrylic platter interaction as well. If you have a Zerostat and used it before touching the ring I wonder what would happen? (Don’t zap your cart) After you play a record and remove it does it seem to have static charge? Another rabbit hole: You might need to clean your a/c cord contacts (including ground pin) or have a loose ground connection at your outlet. Don’t try to check the outlet unless you know what you are doing! You would need to turn the breaker off that supplies the outlet. It’s pretty common for wire holding screws to get loose over time, if you have those type of connections.


Unfortunately I don't have a Zerostat. I haven't noticed a static charge on the records themselves after being played.

I'm not sure about the connections but as I said earlier my other turntable which is connected to the same system simultaneously is dead quiet even when I touch the spindle or metal platter in the same manner.

Why don't these VPIs come with the platters properly grounded from the factory (if that's the cause)? It's insane to have to be chasing these issues that might never occur in the first place with proper grounding .


edw wrote:Acrylic is a big generator of static charge when rubbed. You need to find a way to discharge that static (hence looking at grounding).


What's weird is that the acrylic is dead silent, zero static. It's only when I introduce the P-Ring that I hear the "tick" but only when I touch the ring itself. If I touch the acrylic platter even after it's been spinning with the ring on I get zero static but if I then touch the metal ring-- tick, there it is.
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Re: Periphery Ring Shock

Postby edw » Fri Aug 16, 2019 9:33 pm

I don't think VPI or any other audio manufacturer can take into account all of the permutations of grounding, static, hum, noise, etc., that present themselves in each person's particular setup. Especially when these things can depend on home wiring, cables, and other components that are connected to their product and they cannot control. IMHO, VPI does bend over backwards to help people who use their new as well as discontinued products. That is rare. Plus members on this forum are very knowledgeable and helpful based on their experience.

What may be needed in my setup may not work in yours. So there is no omnibus solution. I wish there were.
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Re: Periphery Ring Shock

Postby madrac » Fri Aug 16, 2019 9:53 pm

As you don't have a ZeroStat (which, IMO, is hit or miss), how about trying something like this?

https://www.amazon.com/Ionizing-Blower- ... way&sr=8-2
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Re: Periphery Ring Shock

Postby Vear » Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:40 am

edw wrote:I don't think VPI or any other audio manufacturer can take into account all of the permutations of grounding, static, hum, noise, etc., that present themselves in each person's particular setup. Especially when these things can depend on home wiring, cables, and other components that are connected to their product and they cannot control. IMHO, VPI does bend over backwards to help people who use their new as well as discontinued products. That is rare. Plus members on this forum are very knowledgeable and helpful based on their experience.

What may be needed in my setup may not work in yours. So there is no omnibus solution. I wish there were.


I totally understand and I'm not knocking VPI but I just wish I could get to the point where it is functioning seamlessly so I can just sit back and enjoy the table with the periphery ring that was designed for it. I've seen several threads where owners have had to run a ground wire from the main spindle bearing (taping it, using plumbing rings, etc., etc.). IMO it's crazy to expect that from a consumer, especially for units at this level.

It's only a wire!! I'm just a little frustrated and offering some constructive criticism. As soon as the first notification of this type of issue was reported on the fora (I realize my periphery ring issue might be different) VPI should have just made it a point to incorporate a fixed secure ground wire from the bearing to the ground nut, just like they do from the tone arm base to the ground nut. This way that issue could be excluded if a problem (like mine) arose in the field (and buyers wouldn't be chasing their tails). If I'm correct, the current Scout or Prime do not have that ground wire. The buyer could then choose to leave it on or disconnect it depending on what works best for them. That's a lot easier than frustrating customers with DIY home remedies, I'm sorry but that is not acceptable.

As for my issue, it's clearly the periphery ring. Without it the table has no static or problems whatsoever and as I mentioned my other table has no issues so I don't think it's my system or power lines. IMO this table shouldn't have a problem with or without the periphery ring because it is not an aftermarket ring but one purchased contemporaneously with the table.

I'd love to keep the ring for the added mass, cool looks and excellent clamping (for the occasional extremely warped record) but using it has been so annoying that I think I may just sell it to solve my problem. I like my systems working perfectly so why introduce something that is causing more pain than pleasure?

Little things like this will put a bad taste in the mouth of new owners. I was considering trying the aluminium platter down the road to use with the periphery ring but after this experience I think I'll just stay put.

I apologize if I'm coming off a little strong but I've been trying to resolve this issue for weeks and I'm a little fed up...

P.S.- Thank you all for your suggestions, you've been very helpful.
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Re: Periphery Ring Shock

Postby Brf » Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:33 am

This is a material science problem, not necessarily a VPI issue. Acrylic is an insulator which can be charged by friction because they easily gain or lose electrons. The metal periphery ring is a conductive material that holds onto their electrons tightly. So what you essentially have is a platter creating a static charge which is being drained and stored in the metal periphery ring just waiting for it to be discharged. Since acrylic is an insulator, the use of a bearing grounding strap will be ineffective.

Some designers of acrylic platters will mix a conducive material (like carbon) with the acrylic to help reduce static thus creating a path for the static charge to drain through the use of a grounding strap. I believe that VPI’s Black Knight series of tables used a carbon infused acrylic platter.

To help reduce static build up on your acrylic platter, you can add a platter mat between the record and platter. I would recommend the Pro-Ject "Leather it" turntable mat.
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Re: Periphery Ring Shock

Postby Vear » Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:54 am

Brf wrote:This is a material science problem, not necessarily a VPI issue. Acrylic is an insulator which can be charged by friction because they easily gain or lose electrons. The metal periphery ring is a conductive material that holds onto their electrons tightly. So what you essentially have is a platter creating a static charge which is being drained and stored in the metal periphery ring just waiting for it to be discharged. Since acrylic is an insulator, the use of a bearing grounding strap will be ineffective.

Some designers of acrylic platters will mix a conducive material (like carbon) with the acrylic to help reduce static thus creating a path for the static charge to drain through the use of a grounding strap. I believe that VPI’s Black Knight series of tables used a carbon infused acrylic platter.

To help reduce static build up on your acrylic platter, you can add a platter mat between the record and platter. I would recommend the Pro-Ject "Leather it" turntable mat.


Thanks for the suggestion. I had already tried using my Empire Anti-Static mat and it didn't help. The P-Ring still ticks when I touch it even when the ring is resting on the record that has the mat under it. Maybe the Project mat would be different but at this point I prefer not to spend $60 to test it. I feel that the lower edges of the outer ring will still be close enough to the platter to continue creating the problem.

Besides, even if a mat did solve the issue it would require me to set the p-ring on top of every record which is a pain. I like to leave the ring resting on the platter for most records just to get the benefit of added rotational mass. In this case the p-ring is in full contact with the platter.

I even tried wrapping the entire inner portion of the P-ring with electrical tape (which I believe is non-conductive) and the ring still ticks when I touch it. I can touch any other piece of equipment on the rack and nothing. It's just the ring. I also tried shielding the Lemo box thinking that maybe the ring (since it passes it closely while rotating) was picking up a a charge there. That didn't help either.

I'm also afraid to try the 20 lb aluminum platter because it may make the issue worse and I'll have to start running DIY ground wires from the bearing again.

I understand the material science issue but VPI chose these materials and advertised these P-Rings to be used with the Acrylic platters in marketing shots. Maybe they should have added a caveat that the metal P-rings may not interact well with the Acrylic platters. Again, these are both VPI products (not aftermarket) and VPI contemporaneous design and material choices. I can't imagine that I'm the first one to experience this issue when combining the two. If my TT is properly grounded from the factory and the issue is the interaction between these two materials while rotating then I believe VPI should never have recommended these two items to be used together.

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Re: Periphery Ring Shock

Postby Brf » Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:43 am

Have you tried an ionizing gun that bombards the surface with both neg and pos charges in an attempt to neutralize the static? There are many factors that contribute to static and not all users with an acrylic platter and a periphery ring will experience static problems. Some phono pre are very susceptible to static etc.
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